Leonardo da Vinci

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Leonardo
Leonardo self.jpg
Self-portrait in red chalk, circa 1512 to 1515.[1]

Royal Library of Turin

Birth name Leonardo di Ser Piero
Born 15 April 1452
Vinci, Florence, Italy
Died 2 May 1519
Amboise, Touraine, France
Nationality Italian
Field Many and diverse fields of arts] and sciences
Movement High Renaissance
Works Mona Lisa, The Last Supper, The Vitruvian Man

Leonardo da Vinci (15 April, 1452 - 2 May, 1519), Florence, Italy me paeda bhaes rahaa. Uu ek Italian chitrkaar, sculptor, builder, inventor aur engineer rahaa.

Mona Lisa

Leonardo's ke sabse jaana maana chapa me rahaa The Last Supper aur Mona Lisa rahaa.

Leonardo da Vinci ek nawaa rakam se chapa ke paint kare ke rakam ke suruu karis rahaa. Jab ki uu time ke artist logan ujjar background pe paint karat rahin, da Vinci dark background kaam me lawat rahaa. Isse chapa me three-dimensional effect awat rahaa. Uu aapan chapa ke dark style ke banawat rahaa jisme dher parchhaen rahat rahaa.

Jindagi[badlo | edit source]

jawani, 1452–1466[badlo | edit source]

Leonardo ke janam 15 April 1452, ke Tuscan ke town Vinci, Arno Naddi ke lower valley, territory of Florence me bhaes rahaa.

da Vinci ke kaam ke suchi[badlo | edit source]

Image
(sort by size)
Details
(sort by earliest likely date)
Attribution status Location
(sort by country)
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The Annunciation
Oil on panel
98 × 217 cm
Dating
c. 1473–4 (Kemp 2011)
c. 1472–6 (Syson 2011)
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Almost universally accepted
Generally thought to be the earliest extant work by Leonardo. The work was traditionally attributed to Verrocchio until 1869. It is now almost universally attributed to Leonardo. Attribution proposed by Liphart, accepted by Bode, Lubke, Muller-Walde, Berenson, Clark, Goldscheider and others.[2]
&Italy, Florence
Uffizi
Florence
Italy
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The Baptism of Christ
Oil on wood
177 × 151 cm
Dating
c. 1476 (Kemp 2011)
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Verrocchio and Leonardo
Painted by Andrea del Verrocchio, with the angel on the left-hand side by Leonardo.[3] It is generally considered that Leonardo also painted much of the background landscape and the torso of Christ. One of Leonardo's earliest extant works. Vasari's statement that the angel on the left is by Leonardo is confirmed by studies by Bode, Seidlitz and Guthman, and accepted by McCurdy, Wasserman and others.[2]
&Italy, Florence
Uffizi
Florence
Italy
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Madonna of the Carnation
Oil on panel
62 × 47.5 cm
Dating
c. 1475–6 (Kemp 2011)
c. 1477–8 (Syson 2011)
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Generally accepted
It is generally accepted as a Leonardo, but has some overpainting possibly by a Flemish artist.[2]
&Germany
Alte Pinakothek
Munich
Germany
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Ginevra de' Benci
Oil on wood
38.8 × 36.7 cm, 15.3 × 14.4 in
Dating
c. 1476–8 (Kemp 2011)
c. 1474/8 (Syson 2011)
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Generally accepted
The work was proposed as a Leonardo by Waagen in 1866, and supported by Bode. Early 20th-century scholars were vociferous in their disagreement, but most current critics accept both the authorship and the identity of the sitter.[2]
&United States
National Gallery of Art
Washington, D.C.
United States
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Benois Madonna
Oil on canvas
49.5 × 33 cm
Dating
c. 1479–80 (Kemp 2011)
c. 1481 onwards (Syson 2011)
Template:Number table sorting/positive
Generally accepted
Most critics believe that it coincides with a Madonna mentioned by Leonardo in 1478.[2]
&Russia
Hermitage Museum
Saint Petersburg
Russia
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The Adoration of the Magi
Underpainting on panel
240 × 250 cm, 96 × 97 in
Dating
c. 1479–81 (Kemp 2011)
c. 1480–2 (Syson 2011)
Template:Number table sorting/positive
Universally accepted
&Italy, Florence
Uffizi
Florence
Italy
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St. Jerome in the Wilderness
Tempera and oil on panel
103 × 75 cm, 41 × 30 in
Dating
c. 1480–2 (Kemp 2011)
c. 1488–90 (Syson 2011)
Template:Number table sorting/positive
Universally accepted
&Vatican City
Vatican Museums
Template:Country data Vatican City
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Madonna Litta
Oil on canvas (transferred from panel)
42 × 33 cm
Dating
c. 1481–97 (Kemp 2011)
c. 1491–5 (Syson 2011)
Template:Number table sorting/positive
Generally accepted
Thought to be by the hand of Leonardo and a pupil, Marco d'Oggiono
&Russia
Hermitage Museum
Saint Petersburg
Russia
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Virgin of the Rocks
Oil on panel (transferred to canvas)
199 × 122 cm, 78.3 × 48.0 in
Dating
1483–c. 1490 (Kemp 2011)
1483–c. 1485 (Syson 2011)
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Universally accepted
Considered by most historians to be the earlier of two versions
&France
Louvre
Paris
France
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Portrait of a Musician
Oil on wood panel
45 × 32 cm
Dating
c. 1485 (Kemp 2011)
c. 1486–7 (Syson 2011)
Template:Number table sorting/positive
Generally accepted
&Italy, Milan
Pinacoteca Ambrosiana
Milan
Italy
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Lady with an Ermine
Oil on wood panel
54 × 39 cm
Dating
c. 1490 (Kemp 2011)
c. 1489–90 (Syson 2011)
Template:Number table sorting/positive
Generally accepted
This painting has been subject to continued disagreement since it was first published as a Leonardo in 1889. The attribution of the "Ginevra de' Benci" has supported the attribution of this painting.[2] The subject has been identified as Cecilia Gallerani.[4]
&Poland
Czartoryski Museum
Kraków
Poland
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Virgin of the Rocks
Oil on panel
189.5 × 120 cm, 74.6 × 47.25 in
Dating
c. 1495–1508 (Kemp 2011)
c. 1491/2–9 and 1506–8 (Syson 2011)
Template:Number table sorting/positive
Almost universally accepted
Generally accepted as postdating the version in the Louvre, with collaboration of Ambrogio de Predis' and perhaps others.[2] Some consider the work of Leonardo's workshop under his direction. The date is not universally agreed.
&United Kingdom
National Gallery
London
United Kingdom
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The Last Supper
tempera on gesso, pitch and mastic
460 × 880 cm, 181 × 346 in
Dating
c. 1495–8 (Kemp 2011)
1492–7/8 (Syson 2011)
Template:Number table sorting/positive
Universally accepted
&Italy, Milan
Convent of Santa Maria delle Grazie
Milan
Italy
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La belle ferronnière
Oil on wood
62 × 44 cm
Dating
c. 1496–7 (Kemp 2011)
c. 1493–4 (Syson 2011)
Template:Number table sorting/positive
Generally accepted
&France
Louvre
Paris
France
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Sala delle Asse decoration
Fresco
Dating
c. 1498–9 (Kemp 2011)
c. 1498 (Syson 2011)
Template:Number table sorting/positive &Italy, Milan
Castello Sforzesco
Milan
Italy
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The Virgin and Child with St Anne and St John the Baptist
Charcoal, black and white chalk on tinted paper
142 × 105 cm, 55.7 × 41.2 in
Dating
c. 1499–1500 (Syson 2011)
c. 1506–8 (Chapman 2010)
Template:Number table sorting/positive
Universally accepted
&United Kingdom
National Gallery
London
United Kingdom
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Portrait of Isabella d'Este
Black and red chalk, yellow pastel chalk on paper
63 × 46 cm
Dating
c. 1499–1500 (Syson 2011)
Template:Number table sorting/positive
Universally accepted
&France
Louvre
Paris
France
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Salvator Mundi
Oil on panel
45.4 cm × 65.6 cm, 25.8 in × 17.9 in
Dating
c. 1504–7 (Kemp 2011)
c. 1499 onwards (Syson 2011)
Template:Number table sorting/positive
Generally accepted[5]
Discovered to be Leonardo's lost painting, rather than a later copy, during restoration in the 2000s. Pentimenti (changes to the composition which would only be found in an original work, rather than a copy) were found in the thumb of Christ's right hand and elsewhere. [6]
Private collection
New York City
Template:Country data United States of America &United States of America
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The Virgin and Child with St. Anne
Oil on panel
168 × 112 cm, 66.1 × 44.1 in
Dating
c. 1508–17 (Kemp 2011)
c. 1501 onwards (Syson 2011)
Template:Number table sorting/positive
Universally accepted
&France
Louvre
Paris
France
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Mona Lisa or La Gioconda
Oil on cottonwood
76.8 × 53.0 cm, 30.2 × 20.9 in
Dating
c. 1503–16 (Kemp 2011)
c. 1502 onwards (Syson 2011)
Template:Number table sorting/positive
Universally accepted
&France
Louvre
Paris
France
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Female Head or La Scapigliata
c. 1508
Earth, amber and white lead on panel
24.7 ×21 cm
Template:Number table sorting/positive
Universally accepted
&Italy
Galleria Nazionale
Parma
Italy
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St. John the Baptist
Oil on walnut wood
69 × 57 cm, 27.2 × 22.4 in
Dating
c. 1508–16 (Kemp 2011)
Template:Number table sorting/positive
Generally accepted
"Anonimo Gaddiano" wrote that Leonardo painted a St. John. This is generally considered Leonardo's last masterpiece.[2]
&France
Louvre
Paris
France


Chapa ke gallery[badlo | edit source]

References[badlo | edit source]

  1. This drawing in red chalk is widely (though not universally) accepted as an original self-portrait. The main reason for hesitation in accepting it as a portrait of Leonardo is that the subject is apparently of a greater age than Leonardo ever achieved. But it is possible that he drew this picture of himself deliberately aged, specifically for Raphael's portrait of him in The School of Athens.
  2. Cite error: Invalid <ref> tag; no text was provided for refs named Chiesa
  3. Giorgio Vasari, Lives of the Artists, 1568; this edition Penguin Classics, trans. George Bull 1965, ISBN 0-14-044164-6
  4. M. Kemp, entry for The Lady with an Ermine in the exhibition Circa 1492: Art in the Age of Exploration (Washington-New Haven-London) pp 271f, states "the identification of the sitter in this painting as Cecilia Gallerani is reasonably secure;" Janice Shell and Grazioso Sironi, "Cecilia Gallerani: Leonardo's Lady with an Ermine" Artibus et Historiae 13 No. 25 (1992:47-66) discuss the career of this identification since it was first suggested in 1900.
  5. For a partial list of scholars who accept the attribution, see Bailey, Martin (31 October 2011). "Leonardo's Saviour of the World rediscovered in New York". The Art Newspaper. http://www.theartnewspaper.com/articles/Leonardo%E2%80%99s%20Saviour%20of%20the%20World%20rediscovered%20in%20New%20York%20/25079. Retrieved 21 February 2012.
  6. Template:Harvnb